Category Archives: Birds

Waxwings

_1100776

Yesterday, whilst out working with some of the rangers from the National Trust’s Souter Lighthouse and The Leas, we spotted a large flock (100+) of Waxwing. These incredibly cool looking winter visitors with distinctive Mohican tufts are a favourite of mine!

Large numbers can arrive in the UK when there is a shortage of food in their Scandinavian breeding grounds. So seemingly, this year and into the next, with the abundance of berries available there could be (hopefully) more encounters to come…

A jawbone

What is thought to be the lower jawbone from a Harbour Porpoise (due to the number of sockets, or holes, where teeth would have been). Shown to me by the rangers from National Trust’s Souter Lighthouse and The Leas.

Volunteering at the Pinnacles National Park

After attending the World Ranger Congress in Colorado, I had an amazing opportunity to follow that up with 3 days of volunteering at the Pinnacles National Park, to work with their rangers and wildlife biologists in a shadow assignment.

Pinnacles National Park is the United States’ 59th and newest national park, located in Central California, 125 miles south of San Francisco.

map_pinn

The park gets its name from the towering rock formations that dominate its landscape – eroded leftovers of the extinct Neenach Volcano (which is in an advanced stage of decomposition after erupting 23 million years ago!). The park is managed by the National Park Service and the majority of it is protected as wilderness.

p1040289

I was lucky enough to spend my time at Pinnacles with a fellow Brit – Chris Lockyer, a ranger working in the Peak District National Park who I had met as part of the National Trust contingent at the World Ranger Congress.

p1030354
The National Trust contingent flying the Union Jack at the World Ranger Congress in Colorado. From left to right – Chris Lockyer (Ranger / Peak District), Janine Connor (Ranger / Tyntesfield), Clair Payne (Ranger / South Lakes), Ted Talbot (Countryside Manager / Peak District) & Chris Wood (Ranger / North York Moors)

I met up with Chris and some of the Pinnacles team on the night before the shadow assignment. We met at a traditional American saloon called the 19th Hole in a town called Tres Pinos, and chatted over burgers and beers!

img_1351

I had already met Jan Lemons, Chief Ranger at Pinnacles, whilst in Colorado. She was our host for our stay at Pinnacles.

What was interesting to find out from Jan was how the team at Pinnacles works – staff cover different roles focusing on specific areas (which back in the UK we generally cover within a single role):

● Law Enforcement Rangers – who have a broad authority to enforce federal and state laws (they have guns!) and are tasked with everything from responding to crime to searching for a missing hiker

● Interpretation Rangers – who provide a wide range of informational services to visitors alongside educational programs

● Maintenance team – who undertake practical work such as building, repairing and preserving trails/signage

● Wildlife Biologists – who work to protect and preserve wildlife and related resources

We eventually arrived at Pinnacles in the dark, stars prickling the night sky with a dim light teasing the surrounding park, offering only disguised glimpses of the landscape we would be working on in the following days…

DAY 1

The plan for our first day of volunteering was to head out with the Pinnacles Condor Crew working on the California Condor Recovery Programme.

p10401891-3

The California Condor is the largest land bird in North America, with an impressive wingspan reaching 3 meters (10 feet).

8465309637_9253806ed0_b-3

They’re majestic creatures that suffered a severe and dramatic population decline in the 20th century – by 1982, there were only 23 condors living in the wild and by 1987, all remaining wild condors were placed into a captive breeding program in an attempt to save them from extinction.

Pinnacles National Park joined the California Condor Recovery Program as a release and management site in 2003.

The team here is led by wildlife biologists Gavin Emmons and Alicia Welch.

Gavin and Alicia took us on the High Peaks Trail, a breathtaking loop passing through and around some of the Pinnacles rock formations, offering some incredible views on the way along with great vantage points to survey for condor activity.

img_1374

On our way along the trail we saw lots of wildlife and I was in awe of anything and everything that moved. One of the highlights was seeing my second species of hummingbird since being in the United States – Anna’s Hummingbird.

Up until that point we hadn’t spotted a condor, and we weren’t necessarily guaranteed to see one either. We had spotted dozens of Turkey Vultures – a very similar, smaller species that can often be confused with the former.

However, almost on cue as we finished off our lunch, what was first thought to be another Turkey Vulture in the distance, soon materialised into a much bigger bird – the California Condor. Approaching us slowly, we had plenty of time to watch it glide effortlessly through the air. And it didn’t stop approaching, eventually passing right over our heads!

p10403161

Every California Condor is identified by a ‘studbook’ number, assigned on their hatch date. The bird we saw was 340.

Version 2

Gavin and Alicia know 340 well and told us a bit more about him:

340

340 hatched in 2004 (the first condor to hatch from Oregon Zoo). After his release in 2005 he started to expand his range and quickly ascended the dominance hierarchy. He is known as a bit of a Rockstar for his feisty behaviour, and is really liked by the Condor Crew and many local visitors. As a culturally significant species to the Wasco tribe, the honour of naming 340 was given to Chief Nelson Wallulutum, who named him Kun-Wac-Shun – meaning Thunder and Lightning. No chicks from him have reached adulthood as of yet. Sadly, last year, a one month old chick of his died. But there is hope this year! He has another chick over a month old which is so far doing well. Fingers crossed.

These birds are an iconic species and an incredible conservation story in the United States (and the World). There are now 410 birds living in the wild. To hear their story, and see one fly above my head, was a privilege and I admire the great work the programme is carrying out and the success it has achieved. Let’s hope the California Condor can continue to prosper!

If any of you are interested, I interviewed Gavin and Alicia, asking them some questions about the work they do and some of the challenges they face in Pinnacles National Park along with why they think conservation is important and what inspires them to carry out this work. See the videos below:

We eventually re-joined the trail and headed back down to our start point, still on a high from our experience up top and taking in more wonderful scenery on our way.

We spent the evening of our first full day at a BBQ with some of the Pinnacles team, including a USA v. UK dart game (UK won!) followed by an intense game of The Settlers of Catan.


DAY 2

Our second day started by checking out a moth trap put out the previous evening.

So many moths! And interesting, some very similar to moths we find in the UK.

One in particular, the One-eyed Sphinx (Smerinthus cerisyi), is incredibly similar to the Eyed-Hawkmoth (Smerinthus ocellata) we find in the UK.

p1040592

After clearing up the moth trap we headed over to meet another member of the Pinnacles team – Paul Travis Lathrop or PT – an interpretation ranger.

PT was a great character – easy going and humorous, yet equally serious about the importance of engaging with visitors, connecting with the disconnected, stimulating thought and developing an honest respect for place.

p1040632

He took us on a short hike, along the way telling us about some of his ideas and programs.

SPACE (Spontaneous Audience Centred Experiences) is one of his programs. As he explained, the idea is trying to revert from traditional interpretation (which focuses on giving visitors as much information as possible, from a number of different angles – History of Pinnacles, Wildlife of Pinnacles, Geology of Pinnacles, Activities to do at Pinnacles etc.) to a new form of interpretation which instead focuses on the visitor themselves – primarily encouraging and stimulating connection.

He gave us some examples:

  • Visitors are offered a Contemplation Card from the visitor centre. Each card has a different statement on the back. The card encourages contemplation from the visitor whilst enjoying the park.
  • A chair is placed somewhere in the park – in a quiet spot, overlooking a scenic view, next to a thought-provoking feature. With the chair is a box – within which there is a notepad and some crayons. It is encouraged on the chair to take 5 minutes to sit down and enjoy your surroundings. The box encourages those who are interested, to leave their thoughts from their 5 minutes either in written words or through a sketch or illustration.

Both of these methods aim to create deeper connections and positive experiences from time spent at Pinnacles National Park.

During our walk with PT the weather was again hot, today breaking 100°F! We kept our hike short and returned to PT’s office early afternoon. Sighing with relief from the air con, PT continued to inspire us with his ideas.

He followed up with his top 5 tips for interpretation:

  1. Thou shall not inflict interpretation
  2. Your smile is part of your uniform
  3. Good manners and charm work wonders
  4. Be punctual
  5. Junior Rangers (young visitors) will receive extra attention

img_14281

Having some free time left following our time with PT, me and Chris decided to so some rock climbing (the area being well-known and well used by rock climbers) with one of the Pinnacles law enforcement rangers, Seth James.

Despite being scared of heights and never having rock climbed before, I had so much fun – scary yet exhilarating. And what a place to climb, Pinnacles National Park !

We finished off our second full day with a visit to a local Mexican restaurant with the Pinnacles team. Super tasty and super (!!!) portions.


DAY 3

Our final day of volunteering at Pinnacles National Park was spent with wildlife biologist Paul Johnson.

p1040877

He took us on a trail through some of Pinnacles’ Talus Caves.

Talus caves are formed when steep canyons and ravines fill with boulders, leaving passages between the largest rocks that are then widened by water and erosion.

We ventured inside a particular cave, closed off to the public at this time of year, due to it being used by a colony of Townsend’s Big-eared Bats.

As we ventured through the cave we saw some interesting wildlife.

Finally we entered the area that Paul said housed the bats, and we surveyed it quietly and quickly, as to not cause any disturbance. Initially we noticed a single bat on part of the cave wall.

p1040768

Delving deeper, soon heard and saw glimpses of bats swooping past and over our heads. But then we were signalled by Paul, who shone his light up to part of the ceiling uncovering a huge maternity roost of bats. Paul was shocked by the size and so recommended we leave, so we promptly followed our trail back out. I managed to get a shaky shot of the roost in Paul’s torchlight:

p1040773

On reflection, Paul said he thinks the colony was as big as it has ever seen at this time of year!

Upon leaving the coolness of the caves, we were hit with the heat of the day (104°F) – it was as if someone was suddenly holding a hair dryer set to hot up to our faces.

We followed a trail up to Bear Gulch Reservoir, along the way spotting lots more wildlife of which Paul gave us more information about.

Our time at Pinnacles was coming to an end. With accommodation booked outside of Pinnacles for the night, we said our goodbyes to Paul and then went on to say goodbye to many of the other Pinnacles staff we had met and made friends with, finally saying by to our host Jan.

p1040721

All in all, my time at Pinnacles was an incredible experience, one that I will never forget!!!

Into the Rocky Mountains

Very little sleep occurred last night. I was restless despite being exhausted and found myself waking up for good around 4am.

There seems to be good reason for this. YMCA of the Rockies, where the World Ranger Congress is being held, is at an elevation of 8,010 ft (2,440 m). To put that in perspective, the highest point in England, Scafell Pike is 3,209 ft (978 m). In Wales, Snowdon is 3,560 ft (1,085 m). In Scotland, Ben Nevis is 4,414 ft (1,346 m). I’m pretty high in the sky!

So, along with the jet lag and the excitement, I think I’m suffering some symptoms of altitude sickness too (I also woke up with a cracking headache) – an insomnious mixture of ingredients keeping me well away from deep slumber.

Anyway, there was a huge upside of being up at 4am – seeing another sunrise, this time over the Rocky Mountains.

IMG_1049

The yearn for sleep soon disappeared, turning into a yearn to explore. I had a free day today, and intrigued by my morning view, I wanted to venture out to see more of my surroundings.

I started with a quick lap of the YMCA grounds, familiarising myself with the site whilst mainly gawping at the snow-capped peaks rising monumentally in the distance.


Despite the altitude sickness symptoms, I also wanted to go a bit further afield. With advice from a member of staff working at the YMCA (who gave me a map and encouraged me to take/drink lots of water), I decided to set out to complete a circular walk starting and ending at the YMCA but taking in a small section of the Rocky Mountains National Park – known as the Moraine Park loop.

*** It’s important to note at this point that this is my first trip outside of the UK since discovering a passion for wildlife. Yet in this respect, everything in the USA is completely and utterly new to me. I know there are lions, tigers and bears (oh my) but not a great deal of anything else. Accordingly, I find myself feeling hysterically intrigued by anything that moves and filled with frenzied enthusiasm for the plethora of wildlife that I might see.

So, scene set and right on queue, as I left the grounds of the YMCA this little guy popped up out of a small hole in the ground.

P1020646

I instinctively dropped into an awkward stance – camera in one hand, binoculars in the other, trying to use both at the same time. ‘What the hell is it!!??’ I thought. I later discovered it was the very common Wyoming Ground Squirrel – but for those few minutes (and still now) it was a marvel of the USA. I mean, come on. Cute!

P1020645

What followed was a whirlwind of new species, seemingly at every step – each having similar consequences to the above…


Jubilant with all of the wildlife I was encountering,  I was then left frantically euphoric with the additional scenery along the Moraine Park loop, making my fragile mind explode. Passing first over Glacier Creek (the boundary between the YMCA and the Rocky Mountain National Park) then the Big Thompson River, I followed on into Moraine Park — a glacial moraine with grand views of the Continental Divide.

IMG_1069

A few hours later, 3 litres of water down, sweaty and dizzy with joy, I made my way back on to the YMCA grounds, and instantly came across another incredible sight – two Elk, a male and a female, grazing right outside the main buildings of the YMCA. This was a species I had only seen alongside David Attenborough on TV, and so to suddenly see them in real life was a further shock to the system, almost as if the high altitude air had decided to give me an uppercut.

Uninjured, thankful and ready to sit down for a short while, I caught up with some more rangers arriving at the YMCA over the rest of the day including a colleague from England – Clair Payne, a ranger also working for the National Trust in the Lake District (this, ashamedly, involved a game of crazy golf in which Lake District won North York Moors, boo!).

A pretty amazing day was topped off with a bright, full moon peeking over the Rocky Mountains, replaced with a sudden brief burst of pink in the sky as the sun set on my first full day in the USA. Amazing!

P1020874

P1020879